24 students received catch-up funding. These students entered John Cabot Academy with a Key stage 2 score below level 4 in Maths or English

 

Year 7 Catch-up literacy

Catch-up literacy students worked with a specialist literacy teacher once a week. Students were in groups of three, but working individually. Each had their own bespoke programme to follow. They had a diagnostic assessment at the beginning and another at the end and an individual report was written and sent home.

There was additional staffing to support a small number of students who were withdrawn from MFL to do additional literacy.

Additional LSAs were deployed in English Accelerated Reader lessons.

Over a period of 7 months the average progress in reading and comprehension scores was one year and five months – which represents an improvement on the previous year’s improvement of one year and four months over the same time period.

 

Year 7 Catch-up numeracy

An additional maths class was funded to enable smaller class sizes for the lower sets. An additional maths teacher supported the class once a week for a number of months. Students also had support from LSAs in the class.

29{a6d30c8a62fcb64e523aef1a61d5dd552560e516c224da626f6e683ccd748591} have now reached level equivalent of 4c or above. 71{a6d30c8a62fcb64e523aef1a61d5dd552560e516c224da626f6e683ccd748591} making at least expected progress.

2014-2015

Year 7 Catch-up literacy

Catch-up literacy students followed one of two programs.

Some worked with a specialist literacy teacher once a week. Students were in groups of three, but working individually. Each had their own bespoke programme to follow. They had a diagnostic assessment at the beginning and another at the end and an individual report was written and sent home.

Some were placed into groups of between 4 and 8 students and worked twice a week during English literacy lessons with a learning support assistant using the reading programs Rapid Plus and Lexia.

Over a period of 7 months the average progress in reading and comprehension scores for both groups was one year and four months.

The Academy received the same funding as last year – £12 600.  Students identified from KS2 results and internal tests have identified 16 students in year 7 who will be in receipt of numeracy catch-up support and 23 students who will receive literacy catch-up support.

Year 7 Catch-up funding

The current provision for the students who are ring fenced for catch up funding is primarily based around literacy support. This support is structured in a way that the students are assessed and those with the lowest score are placed on a 1:1 programme throughout the year. The catch up funding is used to support students in both reading and numeracy, therefore this proposal is mainly focusing on numeracy with a caveat that the resources used can scaffold the work already being done in literacy. ‘Success Maker’ is an online resource administered by Pearson Education and is designed to support students who enter secondary education below 95 points on entry, with respect to reading and numeracy. The software is an independent learning programme that finds the gaps in student’s progress and builds a unique pathway to address the gaps. It cleverly diagnoses the issues in understanding and mastery of skills and adapts each student’s pathway accordingly.

Each student will spend 60 minutes per week to optimise the most impact/progress. This will involve students spending 30 minutes during lesson time and 30 minutes working online from home. The system is primarily designed to instil increased motivation and confidence and preventing students being withdrawn for normal curriculum to access intervention.

Student progress will be reviewed on a termly basis.

How the money is spent:

The Academy invests more than it receives on providing support for students who need literacy / numeracy support on arrival.

Leadership of the project by a member of WLT                      £1940

Special needs teacher                                                             £15680

Support staff LSA (with TLR)                                                     £4249

Cost of Success Maker                                                              £1600

Cost of IT equipment to support Success Maker                       £300

Total                                                                                        £23769

 

 

 

 

2015-2016

24 students received catch-up funding. These students entered John Cabot Academy with a Key stage 2 score below level 4 in Maths or English.

Year 7 Catch-up literacy

Catch-up literacy students worked with a specialist literacy teacher once a week. Students were in groups of three, but working individually. Each had their own bespoke programme to follow. They had a diagnostic assessment at the beginning and another at the end and an individual report was written and sent home.

There was additional staffing to support a small number of students who were withdrawn from MFL to do additional literacy.

Additional LSAs were deployed in English Accelerated Reader lessons.

Over a period of 7 months the average progress in reading and comprehension scores was one year and five months – which represents an improvement on the previous year’s improvement of one year and four months over the same time period.

Year 7 Catch-up numeracy

An additional maths class was funded to enable smaller class sizes for the lower sets. An additional maths teacher supported the class once a week for a number of months. Students also had support from LSAs in the class.

29{a6d30c8a62fcb64e523aef1a61d5dd552560e516c224da626f6e683ccd748591} have now reached level equivalent of 4c or above. 71{a6d30c8a62fcb64e523aef1a61d5dd552560e516c224da626f6e683ccd748591} making at least expected progress.

 

2014-2015

Year 7 Catch-up literacy

Catch-up literacy students followed one of two programs.

Some worked with a specialist literacy teacher once a week. Students were in groups of three, but working individually. Each had their own bespoke programme to follow. They had a diagnostic assessment at the beginning and another at the end and an individual report was written and sent home.

Some were placed into groups of between 4 and 8 students and worked twice a week during English literacy lessons with a learning support assistant using the reading programs Rapid Plus and Lexia.

Over a period of 7 months the average progress in reading and comprehension scores for both groups was one year and four months.